The Hero’s Journey

Joseph Campbell’s stages of the hero’s journey has been stewing on the back burner of my brain. I have been asked to devise some poetry writing workshops for prisoners on that theme on the foot of the concert my husband devised and delivered just before Winter Solstice at our local open prison. It is, I have to admit, a useful framework to do exploratory writing on one’s autobiography and spiritual journey in life.

When one considers both the Journey and the Call to Adventure the zero tarot card fashioned as The Seeker in Joanna Powell Colbert’s Gaian Tarot deck certainly feels apt. In Ellen Lorenzi- Prince’s Dark Goddess Tarot the zero card is the Sheela-na-Gig, displaying her yoni as the great portal of beginnings and endings.

Seeker, Call to Adventure, shero's journey,
From Wikipedia, the Kilpeck, Hertfordshire Sheela-na-gig that Lorenzi-Prince based her own zero tarot card.

In traditional tarot decks, this is The Fool card or The Jester. The Wild Card.

So I suspect that over the next few days I am going to poke and prod at elements of the Hero’s Journey as I pace out the hows and wherefors of a couple workshops. As always, I explore the etymological roots of key words. The roots for the English word hero are a bit uncertain – demi-god, brave, illustrious. The definition seems to cover it, although it does seem rather phallo-centric. Well, we all know sheroes, those brave, demi-goddess women, too!

Adventure, however, is waiting for the arrival.

A Hero

is not the one
who liked the adreneline rush
at the odds,
who liked the shape of the caper.

No, the hero
sensed it before it happened,
knew the risks
was just waiting for the call.

Picked it up,
listened to the message,
despite all
answered and adventured.


Copyright © 2019 Bee Smith. All rights reserved.

The image is from the Rider-Waite tarot deck foundon Wikipedia. To check out The Gaian Tarot’s image for the Seeker go to https://www.gaiantarot.com/

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Wheel of Fortune

The prompt for Day 27 of NaPoWriMo2018 gives us the option of picking a random card from a trot deck. I didn’t use the one they linked in their blog. I happen to have not just one, but two tarot deck,apps on my iPad. I used Joanna Powell Colbert’s Gaian Tarot for my random and Ellen Lorenzi-Prince’s Dark Goddess image for the poem’s raw material. I encourage you to look online at both artistic renderings. The images are in copyright, so no featured inage today. Today’s random pick from the app is Wheel of Fortune. It is Number 10. Being one of those divisible by a 5 is generally bodes…well, let’s just say the most positive spin is turbulence.

I am ready to roll.
Wheel of Fortune

Fortuna favours the ready

to roll with whatever change.

Do not weep. Or cry  It’s not fair!

Gnash teeth, or fall into despair.

Fortuna is fate. Also, the law of gravity.

She is the millstone grit grinding

us all to fine meal.

Even the mighty

shall become again just dust.

The kind we were at the beginning.

The kind to which we all return,

the mystical sort of stuff.

In the interim though, keep your hand

to the helm, thinking you steer the journey.

And some seem to keep their boat afloat.

Some run aground. Some drown.

It is all chance. In a way.

So spend your last pence on a beggar.

Give her a lift up

as your ship goes down.

Fortuna holds us all

In the palms of her hands.

Sometimes Her palm is soft.

Sometimes calloused from the hourglass sand.

Either way, She wears gold wings

to carry us away in the end.

What goes up comes down.

It also comes around.

Which won’t make a story bland.

Copyright 2018 Bee Smith