Weekly Poem – Sunday Morning Meditation

This is the mystery of writing. While you may practice it sitting on your arse staring at the blank page or screen, it happens in other ways, too. The late Dermot Healy once said in a master class I attended that all reading is writing. Even when you are slogging in a very muddy garden performing the autumn clear up tasks, writing is happening on some back burner in the brain. We sleep and dream and wake wanting to write it down and unriddle those images that stir us and make us confront the secret anxieties of our waking life. The longer I am at this writing lark I realise that wielding the written word is a coping mechanism for life. Or perhaps, it is more accurate to say that the creative process is what configures hope, peace, faith and love. It’s just that writing is my preferred creative vehicle driven in this life time. Next one, can I please be a visual artist?

We are living in anxious times. It’s difficult to ignore even if you strictly ration the gloomy news. If you duck the gunk going on the macro, the micro news carried by friends, acquaintances and colleagues cannot be given the blind eye. In my Zoom creative writing class this past weekend I used a quotation from a Leonard Cohen song as the spark for our in-class writing.

Ring the bells that still can ring

Forget your perfect offering

There is a crack, a crack in everything

That’s how the light gets in

Leonard Cohen, Anthem
Goosebumps! This guy is just so good! Bravo maestro!

So the spark for part of the session was about cracks and where the light can get in or out. That is going to be an ongoing exercise over the next few weeks. Even though 92% of the Irish population over the age of 12 is vaccinated, the HSE is still prepping for a “difficult winter.” Medical staff are exhausted, between Covid and the cyber hack of the HSE computer system. Most everyone is flagging emotionally, mentally or physically. Who does not know someone who is down with the ‘cold that is not Covid?’ Resiliance is feeling a bit threadbare. A friend’s 95 year old mother said she felt this past 18 months had been more difficult in many ways than World War II. People may have been dying left and right then, but you could have a cup of tea with a neighbour if you felt down. Or go dancing, while not dodging bombs.

Sunday morning, even though for the first time in a week it was not raining, I woke early and grabbed my notebook. I had a very leisurely few hours of writing ‘downtime.’ The Weekly Poem is the result. It is an abecedarian. It is similar to the acrostic, with lines beginning with a word in alphabetical order over the course of the poem. It was a new form for me to experiment with.

BTW, I recommend finding one day a week for dedicating a morning to just mooch, or lie abed late, or stare out the window for a full hour. It can help steady the centre of world that is fizzing, fizzling, and sending up frantic distress signals.

Sunday Morning Meditation

A milky mist obscures next door’s field, and out
beyond I hear geese honking, a wailing a long way from home. Can it be
Canada is just their summer 'vacance'? Or is Lough Moneen 
   their winter palace?  What is home? I guess it

depends upon how you look at it. I watch them fly
east towards the mountain most days going
forwards and back from the lough, a noisy
gaggle in tight formation, expostulating.

How can we transliterate their soundings?

I look out as the morning gradually takes shape, mist receding over 
    the murky horizon. 
Jays have not visited the garden of late. Are they seasonal, too? 
    How is it that I do not
know my year round neighbours and which are the blow ins 
    from the Arctic?

Listen. Even in October there is some birdsong playlist, several species
making conversation. Or concert? Con-something or other.  Together,
notes make chilled jazz for a Sunday brunch ambience.

Onyx-eyed magpie stares straight at me as I write behind the window’s glass, bemused 
    or beseeching
perhaps. What can a bird want of me? One  likes to 
quantify symbolisms, let the bird’s shape signify, elevate it to messenger from
realms beyond the mist, but by nine o’clock

sunshine breaches this early autumn cloud. The world comes into sharp definition, the day’s light no longer
totally eclipsed. But do you feel the chill
underlying the light? Take the pulse of the unseen, the unheard, untold
verities, a
world of meaning craving anyone’s ear. Or eye. Or heart, offering itself up to be as revealing as the

X-ray that lights up the shadows, showing everything in photographic negative 
     when really what is needed is a very positive
'Yes!' To life. And yes to mourning. And yes to the lost,  and the already gone missing. 
     They are missed. Why did we never notice that once there
     was an ark, but now a

Zoo is an asylum for very nearly, almost, listed, life extinct.

Featured image Photo by Dewang Gupta on Unsplash

Spirited Sunday Quotation Poem

My niece posted a James Baldwin quote which was thought provoking. The Sunday mood tends towards the soulful if you have been brought up in any kind of church. Even when you are lapsed, Sundays tend to include that thoughtful time, the reflection over the past week or the one that lies ahead. The wider world is troubling. Often the wider world reflects the movements in the the micro-world. So here is a quotation poem to set you thinking. It is from the wise James Baldwin. There is, too, a sense of wanting to do better or be better. This quotation is more instructive on what not to do.

The way to be really despicable is to be contemptuous of other people’s pain.

James Baldwin
James Baldwin quotation poem

Spirited Sunday Poems

I offer you two little spirited poems this Sunday morning in the Poetry Daily. One I wrote yesterday after seeing an item about how fireflies are in danger of going extinct. Now, I realise that species are falling like dominoes leaving holes in the trophic cascade, but this one speaks of one of the innocent delights of my childhood. In late August as the nights drew in and bedtime was still a half hour away, I ran around our yard with a jelly jar trying to capture those phosporescing flies. They were magical. I would watch them glow as I fell asleep. Of course, they never survived the night. On one hand I know that those jam jar chases after them are a thing of the past,one more pastime that is relegated to history. On the other hand I know we must compassionately offer a species some future. But gosh, kids today are missing out on so much fun that was available freely in the outdoors in the childhoods of the 1950s.

goodnight fireflies
Goodnight Fireflies!

As I was waking I seemed to have the words purpose, intent and fingerprints rolling around like pingballs in my consciousness. I wanted to find a quotation that might start a five liner. Justine Willis Toms provides the quotation line that begins the poem that I hope offers a bit more uplift after the elegy for the firefly.

heart fingerprints purpose call
The call

I hope you have a Sunday that nurtures your soul and prepares you to answer the call to your Spirit’s purpose in the week to come.