Hero’s Return

You would think it would be all triumphal on the hero’s return. But actually, this is a really tough stage of the hero’s journey. You go back to ‘sort of’ normal. Except nothing ever will be normal again. But you need to build a new normal.

Hero's Return

You can never go home again
once you have been away.
It's just a bit scary to those who stayed.
They don't know you anymore.
They have not seen what you saw.
They don't know what to say,
do not wish to imagine
what adventure's trials wrought.

Sometimes
with luck
there will be one who recognises the spark
who shares your pluck
who will then set sail with you
to new horizons
who will build you a home
in both your hearts
who is your return in hope and love.


Copyright © 2019 Bee Smith. All rights reserved.

Featured image: Photo by Gabriel Bassino on Unsplash

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No Hero

Once the call to adventure comes, Joseph Campbell writes that the next stage of the Hero’s Journey,it is not uncommon to refuse the call. Who am I to be a hero after all? Right?

No Hero

Who am I to be a hero?
After all
it was only a call...

Red pill? Blue pill?
No pill.
No. Thank you.

I want to go back to sleep...

Because?

This is too hard.
I didn't know.
I can't spell.
I am not
(fill in the blank space)
enough
It hurts.
Other people say...
It's okay to say no
after you have said yes.

Except
this is a differant risk.
It is not your body
or your mind.
It's your soul
that's been grabbed.

Love. Be loved.

The most courageous acts
face fear.
Fears - plural -
sometimes.

Sit them on your knee.
Speak to them kindly.

But
Do not go back to sleep!

As Rumi knew way back in the day.
For it is likely to be full
of the bad old dreams.


Copyright © 2019 Bee Smith. All rights reserved.

Featured image  
Photo by Gemma Evans on Unsplash

The Hero’s Journey

Joseph Campbell’s stages of the hero’s journey has been stewing on the back burner of my brain. I have been asked to devise some poetry writing workshops for prisoners on that theme on the foot of the concert my husband devised and delivered just before Winter Solstice at our local open prison. It is, I have to admit, a useful framework to do exploratory writing on one’s autobiography and spiritual journey in life.

When one considers both the Journey and the Call to Adventure the zero tarot card fashioned as The Seeker in Joanna Powell Colbert’s Gaian Tarot deck certainly feels apt. In Ellen Lorenzi- Prince’s Dark Goddess Tarot the zero card is the Sheela-na-Gig, displaying her yoni as the great portal of beginnings and endings.

Seeker, Call to Adventure, shero's journey,
From Wikipedia, the Kilpeck, Hertfordshire Sheela-na-gig that Lorenzi-Prince based her own zero tarot card.

In traditional tarot decks, this is The Fool card or The Jester. The Wild Card.

So I suspect that over the next few days I am going to poke and prod at elements of the Hero’s Journey as I pace out the hows and wherefors of a couple workshops. As always, I explore the etymological roots of key words. The roots for the English word hero are a bit uncertain – demi-god, brave, illustrious. The definition seems to cover it, although it does seem rather phallo-centric. Well, we all know sheroes, those brave, demi-goddess women, too!

Adventure, however, is waiting for the arrival.

A Hero

is not the one
who liked the adreneline rush
at the odds,
who liked the shape of the caper.

No, the hero
sensed it before it happened,
knew the risks
was just waiting for the call.

Picked it up,
listened to the message,
despite all
answered and adventured.


Copyright © 2019 Bee Smith. All rights reserved.

The image is from the Rider-Waite tarot deck foundon Wikipedia. To check out The Gaian Tarot’s image for the Seeker go to https://www.gaiantarot.com/