Geopark Poetry Map Prompt 2

Hello earth lovers everywhere! While curating the #MACGeopark Poetry Map digital project I realised that we have some international interest. For the next fortnight I will be publishing little Geopark Poetry Map Poetry Prompts to help you compose your geoheritage themed poem on one of the sites to put on our digital map.

Here in Ireland we have only just had travel restrictions to move around outside of one’s own country lifted last Monday. So the Geopark staff and I decided we would extend the closing date for submissions since even in Ireland there were only a small percentage of the population that could visit sites. Certainly, those two nearest to my home – Shannon Pot and Cavan Burren Park – were outside my 5km range all winter and I live in a Geopark community.

Poetry is all about connection, often making a surprising Venn diagram between two disparate subjects or objects. While yesterday’s geoheritage poetry prompt offered you images of rock art and megaliths in Cavan Burren Park, today we visit the wet ash woodland of Claddagh Glen.

Claddagh River, Florencecourt, Co. Fermanagh

And, since the sea is about an hour away from us, if I need some positive ions to wash away any angst this is my choice of where to go to ‘shower my head’ (shar yer hay-ed in Armagh parlance) – blow away the cobwebs and any cares.

I think you will agree – Power Shower Head at the Claddagh Glen Cascade Falls!

Poets have always used images – paintings, photos, visual art of all kinds – as poetry prompts. So I will include some photos of walks I have taken in Claddagh Glen over the years marvelling at what water and wind and time create.

I will leave you with a poem I wrote in July 2014 when I guided an American woman and her two children on a Day Out to Geopark sites. One my most vivid memories of that day is standing by the Claddagh River with Bergen as we witnessed a heron swoop down and pass us as it flew up the river course.

What Meredith, Tina, Bergen, Gretchen and I Saw One July Day

The ever shifting light, cloud, weather, shadow
The peat in bags, the drumlins, loughs reflecting light
The rock, the trees, the falling water stained by peat
The well, it's holy water, the cave carved from the rock
The moss dressed trees, bubbles from the well
The feathers, song thrush, surprise of heron swoop through Glen
Heart pebble and river rock with white feather
Water trickling, mizzling, flowing, cascading, the heart
The Pot, the source, the memory, the flowing back, trickling

Bee Smith © 2014

If you are unsure of what geoheritage is read the blog I published last week. https://sojourningsmith.blog/2021/05/11/what-is-geoheritage/.

You can email GeoparkPoetryMap@gmail.com for full submission guidelines and receive lots of research that the Geopark staff have prepared to help you write your poem.Closing Date is 15th June 2021.

Haiku Poetree Walk

My blog schedule is a bit disrupted. But you try leading four workshops within seven days and nursing sciatica on the ‘off ‘ days! I did actually draft this blog twice, but each time the iPad crashed and I lost the draft.  But maybe the universe was telling me I needed some crash time of my own! Third time lucky on the trusty steam laptop. And besides, in the interim one of the haiku walk workshop participants sent me some lovely images and haiku she wrote on the day. Morag Donald has kindly given me permission to share them with you here. (But you might also want to visit her WordPress blog over at Morag Donald Reiki Master & Teacher).

It was Irish Tree week last week and the snow and sleet earlier on had yielded to mist and soft rain and a practically balmy 6C! Those of us living in Fermanagh and Cavan, the lakeland counties in Ireland, are well equipped to deal with most weather eventualities. So my band of hardy haiku poetree walkers arrived well dressed for the occasion.

haiku poetree walkers
Ready to ginko down Claddagh Glen at Marble Arch Caves Visitor Centre

 

We met at Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark Visitor Centre. Many of you know I am also a local Geopark Guide. And in March 2018, that has roared in like a lion, I am being intrepid enough to host two outdoor poetry events in Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark. This first, with a haiku walk down lush Claddagh Glen, was an appropriate venue for celebrating all things arborial in Irish Tree Week.

Irish Tree Week
Lush moss, lichen and fern make Claddagh Glen an evergreen year round walk

And here is the haiku that Morag wrote, inspired during the walk.

haiku Claddagh Glen
Wood elf Copyright 2018 Morag Donald

Along with a tiny notebook, a camera of some sort is often a boon for a haiku walk anywhere.

haiku walk notebook
A tiny notebook like this A7 one with a waterproof cover can be useful on haiku walks. Fits in a pocket. I also recommend fingerless glove!

Haiku celebrates our natural heritage, as well as our relationship with nature. No more than seventeen syllables, the traditional  Japanese poetry form is often seen in three lines of 5-7-5 syllables. But in English that can sometimes feel a bit stilted, so the format has altered somewhat. A seasonal word to anchor the reader in the wheel of the year is also traditional.

As we drove up over Marlbank to Marble Arch Caves Centre, I composed a haiku of my own

Gorse flowers blaze bright

Through the mist and the mizzle

Spring creeps on soft feet

 

haiku poetree walk
Mist over Marlbank, Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark

Although on our haiku walk down the glen it wasn’t sheep we spotted, but some rather splendid antlers on feral goats. They were both too shy and too quick to take a reasonable photo, but here is a haiku snapshot.

haiku by Morag Donald
Copyright 2018 Morag Donald Haiku inspired by wild goats on our haiku walk in Claddagh Glen, Marble Arch Caves

 

It is true that aroma of goat announced their presence on the opposite bank of the Claddagh River.  My own jotting at the time:

River’s negative ions

Feral goat sweat wafts across

Go wild!

And my! The way they were scrambling along a thirty-five degree angle was an impressive sight. Sure-footed is no exageration. They were practically balletic!

 

 

This is their habitat – rock, river, trees. Claddagh Glen is one of my favourite walks. They have an expression ‘to shower my head.’ Which actually sounds more like ‘shar my hay-ed.’  Which translates as getting your mind clear. Whenever I see the  Cascade along the path I feel like I am showering my soul.

haiku poetree walk claddagh Glen
The Cascade waterfall in Claddagh Glen on our Haiku Poetree Walk during Irish Tree Week

 

Haiku walks – or ginko – are ideal opportunities to ‘shower your soul’.  The Japanese practice something that translates as ‘forest bathing’. A haiku walk in scenic splendour has a similar replenishing effect.  I will be planning more in 2018 in and around Marble Arch Caves Global Geopark. If you would like to take part in one, please fill in the contact form below, letting me know when you will be in our part of Ireland.